Category: Productivity

The Time Lords Manifesto

The ultimate promise of technology was that we’d be able to reclaim our time. Economist John Maynard Keynes even suggested that we’d only need to work about 15 hours per week and as a result, we’d be able to spend more time on things like creativity, innovation, and problem-solving, even leisure. I don’t know what…
Future of Work, Productivity, Time Lords

Master creativity — the future depends on it

According to the World Economic Forum, creativity will be the third most in-demand job skill in 2020, behind critical thinking and complex problem solving. That’s because as AI, machine learning, and automation mature, we’ll begin to put a premium on human skills like creative thinking. “When the data is all being spit out for you,…
Future of Work, Productivity, Startup

The Stoic’s guide to time

One of the hallmarks of our work future is time. As we offload more mundane and repeatable tasks to machines, we’ll be rewarded with more time to focus on the things that we do best as humans. But how should we spend that time? What should we do to make sure we don’t squander the…
Future of Work, Productivity

AI and the rise of the emotional economy

Intelligent machines are starting to do many tasks that until recently were the exclusive domain of people. From delivering pizza to filing simple legal briefs, AI-powered software agents and robots are taking tasks away from humans. But while doom and gloom prognosticators have dominated mainstream media with predictions that this will inevitably cause mass unemployment,…
Future of Work, Productivity

4 ways AI is remaking sales

Technology was supposed to save us time and make our lives better. But for most of us, all the tech in our lives has just added to the burden. From the hundreds of emails and thousands of Slack messages we sift through each day, to the nonstop Google calendar scheduling (and rescheduling) ping pong, we’re…
Calendar, Meeting Scheduling, Productivity

What a 15-hour work week means for startups

In 1930, in the throes of the Great Depression, economist John Maynard Keynes published an essay he’d been working on since before the stock market crash titled “Economic Possibilities for our Grandchildren.” In it, Keynes made two audacious claims, especially given the tattered state of the economy: that economic output would grow about sevenfold by…
Future of Work, Productivity, Startup